Monday, August 5, 2013

World Breastfeeding Week Salute

After about a million and a half unexpected views on this particular blog entry, I became aware that some of the images I had used to add humor to it may be copyrighted and not mine to borrow. In the interest of "better safe than sorry", I decided to remove any picture that wasn't mine. I hope you still enjoy my little salute to Nursing Mamas, even without the pictures. :)



Did you know that this is World Breastfeeding Week?? Did you know there was a World Breastfeeding Week?? Well there is! I breastfed the twins for a few weeks before making the decision to switch to formula, and that is a decision I do not regret one bit! They thrived on it and I was able to regain some of my sanity after those incredibly difficult first few weeks. I have fed my babies in numerous different ways, from breastfeeding to formula feeding to exclusively pumping...they all have had their ups and downs. I'm so thankful God provided so many ways to feed and nourish our little ones! 

But since this is World Breastfeeding Week, I'd like to throw a shout out to my fellow breastfeeding mamas. Nursing Jones has been one of the most challenging, difficult, painful, rewarding, stressful, hair pulling, peaceful, relaxing, joyous experiences of my life!! It has been a roller coaster of emotions for the both of us, but I am so glad we have been blessed to be able to do this together. We've battled weight loss (his, not mine, unfortunately), tongue tie, low supply, terrible latch, mastitis (twice), just to name a few. So I'm pretty proud of the fact that we've come this far and have finally gotten to a place where we both enjoy it and he is growing and thriving! 

So to all you other breastfeeding mamas out there, this is my salute to you. 

To those mothers who spent the first weeks and months of your child's life literally attached to them 24 hours a day, I salute you. You, who eats, sleeps, and yes, sometimes even showers whilst simultaneously nursing your little nursling. Who can't remember the last time you slept longer than three solid hours without being awoken by a screaming baby and/or a soaking wet shirt. I salute you. 

You, who has traded in her pretty, lacy, normal sized bras for unrecognizable contraptions with snaps and buckles and removable fronts in sizes you'd never thought you'd achieve without six thousand dollars and a good plastic surgeon, I salute you.

You, who took on the feeding of your infant entirely on your own, who is solely and fully responsible for their nourishment. Who didn't leave their infant's side for days, weeks, months, even to do simple errands, because you feared they would surely starve should you get stuck in traffic on the way home. You, who knows that the term "nursing vacation" is no vacation at all. Who's husband and mother and children hear one peep from your tiny bundle of joy and hand them right over to you saying, "I think he's hungry!" You, who simultaneously loves and hates that you are the only one on earth who has what your baby needs to survive, a job you take more seriously than anyone else can understand, I salute you.

 I salute those breastfeeding mamas who have sat in that doctor's office, bawling your eyes out because your baby is not gaining weight at the perfectly perfect "normal" rate all pediatricians came together and decided on so that they could strike fear and guilt into any breastfeeding mother whose child does not meet this perfectly perfect timeline. You, who does not have the benefit of ounce markings on your breasts and has absolutely no idea how much or how little your baby is eating, only that they are eating all the time. All. The. Time. 

I salute those mothers who have achieved their doctor's weight expectations and swell with pride (and milk) as they are patted on the back for doing such a great job growing their little human.

And to all those mothers who are growing those little humans despite mounting obstacles, who have battled tongue tie, low supply, excruciating pain, or all of the above and more, and have seen specialist after specialist trying to figure out what you're doing wrong, all of whom tell you one different thing after another. To those moms who stuck with it and to those who grieved the end of their breastfeeding relationship earlier than they anticipated, I salute you. 

To those breastfeeding mamas who feel the eyes of onlookers boring into them and their hungry baby at the restaurant, or the grocery store, or the bleachers of your son's basketball game, and silently wonder if feeding your crying baby will offend anyone, I salute you. I especially salute those mothers who have learned not to care one iota who will be offended and feed their baby without cover or hesitation, without shame or embarrassment, paving the way for the rest of us to do so comfortably as well.

And to those breastfeeding mamas who do use that cover, that blasted cover, I salute you. You, who have been asked to or feel pressured to cover up your two square inches of exposed skin so as not to offend the nineteen-year-old in a transparent tank top and shorts with the word "JUICY" emblazened across her buttcheeks at the next table over. You, who have mastered the art of wrangling a starving, squirming baby with one hand whilst simultaneously unhooking your bra, flopping out a boob and latching your baby with the other. You, who has learned to do all of this blindly,  under a tent which is surely made of the heaviest, hottest material known to man, while your baby looks up at you forlornly with a look that says, "Why the hell do I have to eat under this tent? It's 900 degrees under here woman!!!". 

You, who wonders to yourself what the logic is in making nursing covers so women can breastfeed "discreetly" when every single one you have ever seen is decorated with the brightest, most flamboyant patterns known to man. Who feels as if every time you pull it out of your diaper bag and throw it over your body, you are declaring to the entire area, "BEHOLD!!! I AM NOW GOING TO BREASTFEED MY BABY!!! BUT I'M GOING TO DO IT UNDER THIS LARGE TENT DECORATED IN BLINDING COLORS SO AS NOT TO OFFEND ANY OF YOU!!! BUT PLEASE KNOW THERE IS LACTATING CURRENTLY HAPPENING. UNDER THIS TENT. THIS TENT RIGHT HERE. LACTATING."

Yes, I salute you and your tie dyed nursing blankets. And to those of you living in the desert and breastfeeding in sweltering heat, I salute you twice. You and your sweaty babies.

I salute you, mothers who have endured nasty stares, rude comments, and blindly ignorant opinions regarding breastfeeding. For those who have friends, family, and co-workers who gag on the very word "breastfeed" and can barely make eye contact with you when you must do so in front of them. To those who have been told that breastfeeding is "so gross" by a world that pours the breast milk of a farm animal on their cereal every morning. And to those who have not only ignored these people, but have also rebounded with a quick remark of your own, or better yet, a shot of breast milk in their eye, way to go mama!!!




Nursing Jones with my "flamboyantly yellow" nursing cover




To those breastfeeding mamas who were promised it was the cheaper, more economical option than formula, but have spent a small (or large) fortune on breast pumps, lactation consultants, nursing bras and pillows with names like, "My Brest Friend", I salute you. 

I salute those breastfeeding mamas who have fed their babies at restaurants, in the car, at the park, in the garden aisle at Target, in the front pew of their church and in the shallow end of the wave pool. 

I salute those mothers who have mastered nursing their babies while cooking, cleaning, blogging, and sleeping. Who take the term "multi-tasking" to a new level.

To those mothers who pray for a hypnotist that will one day be able to remove from your husband's brain the image of you pumping on the living room sofa while eating a bowl of ice cream. Who wonder if your son will someday require expensive therapy for all the times he's seen you whip out your boobs. I salute you, nursing mamas, who have caught your young daughters lifting their shirt to feed their baby doll, and felt pretty proud of yourself when you did. Good job mama, I salute you and your future breastfed grandchild.

To those working mothers, who have lugged a pump, a cooler, bottles and ice packs with them to the office every single day, I salute you. You, who have spent hours upon hours attached to a groaning machine, watching your nipples stretch to unnatural and horrifying lengths while you pray that you'll squeeze out enough milk to get your daycare provider through the next day. You, who have pumped in closets, cars, your boss's office and rooms labeled "LACTATION", praying no one walks in and sees you in a way no person should ever see another person. Ever. To those mothers who have driven home at ungodly speeds in order to make your baby's next feeding, only to walk in and find your husband giving him a bottle, I salute you.

You, who puts your very value as a mother and a human being in the amount of milk you tote home that day. Who knows how much work and time went into those bottles and turns into a raving lunatic if anyone says the phrase, "Is that all you got?"  I salute the mothers who have literally poured out themselves into providing the best for their baby, only to accidentally knock it off the kitchen counter. I salute those of you who have had husbands jokingly tell them not to cry over spilled milk. And I salute you if you did, or did not, throat punch him.

On that note, I'd like to take a moment to salute the dads of these breastfed babies. To those husbands who have stood by their partner and supported her through the tears, the fears, the failures and the big wins. Who have taken on diaper duty because it is only fair that if she is in charge of input, you should be in charge of output.  You, who have listened to the phrase, "Looky, no touchy" for a year or more and have given tender nicknames to your offspring like "Titty Monster" and "Boobie Hog". To those dads who have spent countless hours washing pump parts and fetching ice water to make things on mama a little easier, I salute you. 

To those mothers who have powered through sore nipples, nursing strikes, teething babies, and growth spurts, I salute you. You, whose babies have the power to erase every bad experience and melt away every ounce of stress and frustration with one tender glance upwards as they nuzzle up against you. You, who feel both elation and depression at the very thought of weaning your nurslings. 

To all the mothers who have spent hours crying and praying and stressing over feeding your baby, and have been rewarded with one of the most special experiences this life has to offer. You, who knows what "milk drunk" looks like, and your heart fills with pride and joy that you are the one who put that pure look of contentment on your baby's face. You, who cherish those quiet moments in the wee hours of the morning when it's just you and your baby, doing only what you and your baby can. Who practically melts when your baby wraps his hand around your thumb, or pats your chest, or plays with your necklace. To all the mothers who have sacrificed your body, your sleep, your time, and a bit of your sanity in order to offer your babies the gift of mommy milk, this week is for you.

I salute you mama, and your baby does too.



I am so blessed to get to nurse Jones. I know it is a blessing and a privilege and I don't take it for granted one bit. I worked so incredibly hard to have the breastfeeding relationship with him that I do, and that work was worth it to me, because I didn't have a positive nursing experience with the twins and I very much wanted to have one with Jones. It is only by the grace of God that we made it past those first two months and finally got the hang of things, and I very often thank Jesus out loud that He did get us through it! I often spend the time I am nursing Jones just staring at him and thinking about all God brought us through to get me to this point, and how He built in this special time of reflection for a few hours into each of my days. So in celebration of all it took to get us here...Happy World Breastfeeding Week, my fellow nursing mamas. Go buy yourselves a treat. ;)




Nursing Jonesy...sans cover ;)




261 comments:

  1. This is awesome! I can't believe nobody has commented yet, I bet this will go viral on facebook :) Thank you for writing this!

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    1. Looks like you were right Kristi! It definitely went viral, and I NEVER imagined it would be seen by so many haha!

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    2. I was blessed to be nursed by my mother in the 1950s and I carried on that tradition with my 4 children--through baby and me having the flu (you both get over it quicker), and after a delay of 3 weeks because I was on medication. Nursing began my pursuit of knowledge about nutrition. The most perfect food for your baby is your breast milk, so if you are able to nurse or to pump, I urge you to do so. Science cannot duplicate the formula. And there is another benefit for your children:I have read that most breast fed babies are more intelligent. Relax, enjoy, eat well, and don't overdo life. "I'm nursing my baby and babies can't wait." This grandma says "nurse on!"

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  2. It'll go viral on Facebook! I'm certainly passing it on to as many people as I can :)

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  3. what a wonderful tribute! And I salute YOU for sticking it out through so many tough things!

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  4. I breastfed all 8 of ours and my youngest is now 5 (weaned a long time ago, in case i just freaked anyone out), and I smiled all the way through this. Good memories - memories of some pain and frustration and tears, too. But mostly just so dang thankful I had the privilege of nursing every one.

    Thanks for posting this. It was a delight to read!

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    1. Yes I too was blessed to be able to breastfeed all three of mine. Later ones longer than first cause I learned a lot with her! I was so thankful to have La Leche League's book The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding. I never could have made it without it. I also nursed through sore nipples, cracked nipples, mastitis, the flu and lot of static from other people! So Kudos to all you moms who brave it out and hang in there (no pun intended) I wouldn't give a million dollars for the experience. I later went on to become a La Leche Leader, a birth & postpartum doula. I am now 68 but every time I see a nursing baby.......I wish I could do it all over again!

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  5. LOVE! What a wonderful tribute to all the BFing mamas out there.

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  6. Awesome! Love it! :) We are going on 9 months strong! :)

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  7. I breastfed all 5 of, my kids, all till past 2 years old and one till almost 3! It was a great experience, and its what I believe in. I did breastfeed in public (if needed,) but with a cover up. You can choose one for the right weather so as not to smother the baby! It was easy, convenient, modest, and no big deal. Some things here are so funny. Some of the hype though about "oh us poor breastfeeding moms are so persecuted" is just silly to me. We really can do what we need to do, and remain practically unnoticed if we just try! It's really NOT hard to do. lol

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  8. Just found this - it was so so true. I've been in just about every one of those situations :)

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  9. Loved this! It made me nod in agreement and laugh.

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  10. Haha, this is hilarious! You really captured *all* of the different aspects of it! Nursing in the garden isle at Target--hahahaha! Or on the curb of the sidewalk across the street from the police station because there is no place else to sit... anywhere!

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  11. I loved this! My youngest is almost 8 (oldest is a teenager), so my breastfeeding days are long gone. But I nursed all of mine into toddlerhood and beyond, so I have a good decade of nursing behind me, and I could relate to just about every word you wrote. And much of it made me laugh out loud - such wonderful memories. Just wish I'd been crafty enough to make one of those boob cover ups and boob baby hats! I was definitely a 'nurse when and where baby needs to nurse' kind of mom - I'd never have survived all those years of breastfeeding if I hadn't been.

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  12. Thanks for remembering and saluting those of us for whom "low milk supply" as been an undiagnosable and unrecognized phenomenon. Thank you.

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    1. I'm sorry about that. I know that pain. I was able to breastfeed for the first few months, but after that, my milk supply dwindled. I just had a baby on Christmas Eve, but almost 3 months later, got the flu, bad, and after a temperature of 105 for a week, I was so dehydrated, I could not replenish my milk. It was very hard on me, for both my girls, when I had to stop. However, it is still noteworthy, that though low milk supply may be an issue for you, clearly, the benefits of breastfeeding are not lost to you. It is still an awesome thing for you to support. (When I had my first 4 years ago, Nurses told me about breast milk banks. that if I had extra milk (hahahahaha) I could donate it to babies who needed it. Breastmilk is actually STERILE. I'm not sure what types of services are out there now, as far as that's concerned, but I found it incredible that this was offered.)

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  13. this was great. the comics were so funny. I was laughing so hard. very true:)

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  14. I don't know how I missed this post during WBW. Wish I had seen it then so I could have included it in my blog's series. In any case I'm going to share it with my readers now! Thanks for the wonderful post.

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  15. Thank You So Much! Reading This Brought TeArs To My Eyes. Im 6 Days Postpartum With My Second And The Struggles Have Already Begun. It Helps To Know Im Not Alone With Low Supply Issues.

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    1. You can do it, Mama. Even if you find that you have to switch to formula, it's okay. Never ever feel alone or that you failed or somehow cheated your child. You'll do whatever you need to do for your precious little one, and no matter what it will be the right decision because YOU are his/her Mama. Good luck.

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    2. Brewers Yeast may help with the low supply, as well as lots of liquids! I made it successfully through 5, and am SO GLAD I chose this! All the pluses listed above are sooo true...sooo worth any struggle! Something I started experimenting with, with our last child, was the use of progesterone (a natural cream!)to increase milk supply. It's something you could check into. Here is a website to start with, along with it's rabbit trails: http://allonhealth.com/natural-progesterone-breastfeeding.htm

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    3. My breast milk supply was on life support, here are the list of things I used to help me boost it a little...
      Fenugreek pills, Blessed Thistle pills, Mother's Milk Tea, and Brewer's Yeast (powdered or liquid) baked into cookies.

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    4. for a not-so-natural helper with low supply, get your OB to prescribe you some Reglan. I tried the herbs and they didn't work for me. I took Reglan for a solid year to get through. good luck mama!

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    5. I have also suffered from low milk supply. With my first my milk dried up after 2mo's. So with my daughter, who is now 9mo's old, I was determined to keep my supply up. I have struggled since day one with my supply. I have tried fenugreek pills, mother's milk, and yeast. although it helped it really wasn't getting me the amount that I needed when I would pump. Then I was told that after my daughter ate to then manually express for about 5mins on each side. Since doing this my supply went from pumping 1-1.5oz (all together from both sides) at a time to doing anywhere from 3-4 oz. Also oatmeal worked for me eating it from breakfast would help me pump extra in the morning. Hope this helps and that you are able to continue helping.

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  16. This was wonderful! I could relate to many of these stories. Breastfeeding brought a closeness to all my babies that I will always treasure. I had my ups and downs, but can smile and laugh over the memories. Now my daughter is preparing to breastfeed our first grandchild. I hope she will treasure the moments she will make with her little one.

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  17. Thank you for sharing this! I nursed both my children and am so very thankful for the bonding experience! The benefits go way beyond any inconvience. Better health, better immune system for the baby against diseases, less chance of breast cancer for mom, less allergies, easily digestible, no constipation, better jaw and teeth development, less expensive and more. I have read that there are 2 different milk ducts in each breast- one for cream and one for milk. When we are distressed ie: death of family member, moving, financial etc., it affects the cream which is where they gain the weight. The goal is to minimize as much as possible distress and give it all to the Lord Jesus Christ who can handle it. In a sex-crazed and confused culture, we have to see that ulitmately God made our breasts with milk ducts in order to feed our babies. He doesn't make mistakes and His ways are always best! Man-made can not duplicate what He has done. Blessings to you all. :-)

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  18. Love this so much! My 13 month old daughter weaned 3 weeks ago and I've had mixed feelings ever since, and still tear up now and again! It was honestly one of the best things I've ever done in my life and I will treasure it forever. I look forward to getting pregnant again and beginning a nursing relationship with a new little baby!

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  19. How beautifully put! My 13 month old daughter just weaned 3 weeks ago and I miss it terribly. Nursing her was one of the best things I've ever done. I cannot wait to get pregnant again in a while and begin the nursing relationship with a new little baby!

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  20. this blog is so great!

    i nursed my daughter from birth to 20 months...that was until my son was 4 months, yup! through pregnancy and all... Now my son is 18 months and i am pregnant and still nursing... So i have been nursing non stop for 2-almost 3 years. lol.... I am weaning him now so hopefully he'll be done by 20 months as well...but 6 monhts later i'll be back on the wagon.. It's such a cool thing though, I love breastfeeding! I love the closeness i have with both of my kids and soon with #3.

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  21. This is awesome! Thank you! I still nurse my one year old(second daughter) and weaning her is very difficult because she loves to be with mommy all the time. I had nursed my first for one whole year. It was a very challenging time. I love nursing my girls but one year is enough for me! Lol!

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  22. Love this sooooo much!!

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  23. I am a mother of two littles. I tried breastfeeding our first and got mastitis horribly I could not continue and she wouldn't latch on through out the drama of mastitis. With our second I had breast issues and needed surgery therefore prevented me from breastfeeding him. I WISH I WISH I WISH I could have. I cried all the way to Walmart when buying formula feeling like a failure as a mother to my beautiful prayed for babies. As much as I hated myself and felt so badly about my mothering skills I quickly found that HEY MY BABY IS GROWING, thriving and healthy! PRAISE GOD! Though I am 100% support of breast feeding obviously (its totally the reason for boobs) I fear and have witnessed first hand, that mothers who aren't get looked down upon. Just like my background you never know the reason some are formula feeding and it doesn't make them bad mothers. I think we as fellow mothers, need to just watch how we speak to each other and just HOW passionate we are about things of this nature? Does that make sense? Not saying dont be an advocate but we just need to be sensitive and never condemning. :) I am all for breastfeeding and I am a women as well, OBVIOUSLY. But I will be the first to say. I do NOT want to see anyones breasts lolol Im just being real. I don't want to see them and I surely do not want my children MY children seeing anyone elses breasts. Modesty can still happen. I know it gets hot under those cover ups but so do my boobs in my bra and shirt but I'm not letting them hang all out. hahahahaha Just saying lolol Cover them suckers up ladies. I would appreciate my husbands eyes only seeing mine, I don't want to see them and I FOR SURE dont want my littles eyes seeing them. Some still do appreciate modesty. hahahaha

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    1. I appreciate your point of view, and I'm sorry you had to end your breastfeeding journey earlier than you planned! It is such a hard thing to let go of, I did with my twins and I remember the feeling! But you are not a failure in any way! It sounds like you love your babies very much!

      I do find it funny that in this country "modesty" is only brought up when talking about breastfeeding mothers. I've never seen such conservative liberals as the ones who get in a tizzy over public displays of infant feeding! Maybe I live in a bubble, but every time I have ever seen a mother breastfeed her baby without a cover, she is extremely modest about it and it is the least sexual thing on earth. But maybe there are women out there who rip their whole top off and do a little dance before beginning a feed...I don't know! ;)

      Thanks for your comment!

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    2. your boobs do not need clean fresh oxygen - babies do. so comparing keeping your boobs covered to covering a baby while feeding is bit strange to me. as far as your husband and your children - do they ever watch tv or movies? does your husband really have so little self control that he would not be able to keep his eyes to himself? you ought to give your man a little more credit than that. it's just as easy for you to steer your family in another direction if you feel uncomfortable but to put your discomfort ahead of someone else's right to feed their child is ludicrous. modesty has no place in the breast feeding discussion. no mother is trying to 'show off' her breasts when she is feeding her baby.

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    3. Not sure why you even commented. She addressed all of this. Get over yourself.

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    4. I agree with Andra; modesty has no place in a discussion about nursing. There is nothing sexual about nursing a child.

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    5. I agree with Andra; modesty has no place in a discussion about nursing. There is nothing sexual about nursing a child.

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    6. You sound bitter. Figures you would comment the way you did; you never breast fed, therefore have no idea what you're talking about.

      Bf'ing mother of 4, who never used a cover. Gasp.

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    7. The vitriol aimed at this mama angers me. I am currently breastfeeding my 3 mo. old & while I am all for being able to bf anywhere & anytime, I personally find it very uncomfortable to nurse w/o a cover if I'm in public. I think it is rude & thoughtless to just "whip it out" - especially if there are men around. While I agree that it's not supposed to be sexual, I can tell you that I have seen more than my share of women bfing w/o a cover that were showing more than was comfortable for me...let alone what a man or a child should see. Rather than tearing her down for her opinion, maybe you should be more respectful!

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    8. The vitriol aimed at this mama angers me. I am currently breastfeeding my 3 mo. old & while I am all for being able to bf anywhere & anytime, I personally find it very uncomfortable to nurse w/o a cover if I'm in public. I think it is rude & thoughtless to just "whip it out" - especially if there are men around. While I agree that it's not supposed to be sexual, I can tell you that I have seen more than my share of women bfing w/o a cover that were showing more than was comfortable for me...let alone what a man or a child should see. Rather than tearing her down for her opinion, maybe you should be more respectful!

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    9. Queen, thank you so much for being a breast feeding mother willing to stand up to those who beat down and degrade any one who dares ask for modesty, and to stand up for a formula feeding mother!!!

      I formula feed, but I struggled to attempt to breast feed for 6 months before my "failure" fully set in so I can understand the struggles. My son was literally starving to death and because I live in an area that is VERY pro-breast feeding his pediatrican didn't want to believe me when I said my breast simply did not work and he shamed me into believing I was a horrible mother for giving my son the little forumla I did, for even considering formula full time, and that I was less then a "real" woman because not only did my breasts not work as well as they should, they didn't work at all really, but I was not going to expose them to every one who might be sitting around me.

      Most women do breast feed modestly however those that don't give breast feeders in general a bad name and pushing for women to just let it all hang out because that is what your baby "needs" are lying to them selves if they think that will help their case.

      I had a woman walk around a grocery store with her breast hanging out before she latched her child on, who was in a sling, and after because she choose to not wear a shirt at all. When asked to cover her breast, after she feed her child and was walking around exposed, she responded with her child might become hungry later so she would just leave her breast out and any one who had an issue with that was a pervert.

      Those type of women are the ones that put a hesitance for breastfeeding in public in my mind. Just as breast feeding women want respect and common courtesy shown to them so to does every one else. Those around you, unless they are your husband or feeding child, don't want to see your breast. It isn't sexual it is simply a modesty/privacy thing, respect that with out calling names or assuming people are drooling over your breast because chances are they aren't.

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    10. I bf both my girls for the first year and I used a "tent!" Not because I felt pressured to do so, but because its modest! Did either of my babies suffocate and die under there? NO! Not wearing a cover has nothing to do with babies needing clean fresh oxygen, because under the tent there is clean fresh oxygen. Did I like using the cover, no it's not a favorite, but we don't always like the things that are right. Just because everybody else is flashing their boobs on TV and in VS, doesn't mean I need to. We are not accountable for others choices, but we are responsible for our own. I will not show my breast to any man who is not my husband regardless of how much or little is shown PERIOD!
      Anonymous poster: I'm sorry you were not able to bf! It is such a special thing, but the Lord knows your heart- you wanted nothing but the best for your child and you tried your hardest! The Lord will bless you and your child for that! Never feel like you were a failure b/c you couldn't continue bfing! You are a wonderful loving mother who I'm sure teaches her children love and compassion and that's more than I could say about some of the other moms!

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    11. Empathising totally with this ladies struggles until I got to the "modesty" part and realised that this was probably a big contributary factor to her owm struggles with bfeeding. Bfeeding begins in the brain (its psycological) and if we are uptight about breasts or anything else, it affects the physical. In bfeeding, this is the "let down" reflex, if hindered the baby goes hungry and the breasts become blocked with milk, a vicious cycle which can only be broken by the mother relaxing (difficult (but not impossible) with a by now screaming baby), also "viewing" breasts as primarily a beautiful God given source of milk for precious infants greatly influences the process. No need to feel guilty about doing the right and loving thing for your precious babes by giving them formula in this instance, but dont be uptight about others bfeeding "imodesty" as this certainly didnt help you in your own painful struggles.

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  24. Love this soooo much! Had to hold back laughing out loud so that I wouldn't wake my son. Amazing. Still chuckling over the nursing cover paragraph. I'm so there. Bright colors and hot....all to make others comfortable. Still doing it, but now I'll be laughing about that as I do =)

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  25. Love, love, LOVE!!! I didn't get to breastfeed my oldest due to serious health issues on my part, so when I had my boy/girl twins nearly a year ago I was determined to make it work. After nearly three months of supplementing with formula, I was able to breastfeed both babies on my own, and still am! My seven-year-old son has seen so much now, but I decided that it certainly doesn't hurt having his first thought of breasts be non-sexual -- and he has taken it amazingly in stride (although I had to laugh at your comment about wondering if he'll need therapy!). I know I'll go through some kind of depression when they wean, but for now I'm just trying to make every moment count. I have been beyond blessed by God in getting this experience. Thanks for sharing! :)

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    1. Oh Tracey kudos to you for breastfeeding twins! You are a super hero in my book!!!

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    2. I have been having trouble trying to get my milk supply to increase, I did not do enough research prior to the birth of my baby boy and this caused me to agree to giving formula (in a bottle!) to my days-old baby.. what a mistake it was.. my milk came in a few days later and i was crying my eyes out thinking about how bad a mother i was as i was able to pump only 0.5 ounces after 4 hours!! i thought breastfeeding was all natural and easy. but boy, how stressful and difficult it was! my boy is now 3 months old and my milk supply has gotten really low, in 8 hours, i get to pump only 1.5 oz of milk! i forgot to mention that i am a working mother and to find time to pump is another issue.. :(

      i can't help but notice that you were supplementing until your boy was 3 months old.. may I know some of the tips of getting the supply to increase after such a long period..i have heard before that it is best to try all measures possible during the first month or is it too late for me at this point? I value honesty so don't afraid to tell me that it is indeed a bit too late :P.. i can keep the pointers in mind for my next baby! :) thanks!

      Almost forgot to mention how beautiful and entertaining this piece is and yet very true to the core! :)

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    3. Ina, I have heard that fenugreek(natural remedy) works well to increase your supply(never tried it). I supplemented the entire time with my little one, but my supply was pretty decent. My baby is tongue-tied, so she was unable to latch, and I could pump 4 ounces every two hours. Just make sure that after breastfeeding that you pump as much as you can to completely empty both breasts. Your body will notice that you are completely emptying them, and you will naturally begin to produce more. I've also heard that Reglan(a prescription) works well to increase supply. Make sure that you are not doing anything that could inhibit your supply such as taking birth control pills, decongestants, etc. Also try warm compresses before feeding, which should also increase flow. Search the web for other ideas as well. I always used La Leche League as a great reference. Good Luck!! Hope that helps! :)

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    4. Ina, go to BabyCenter.com and look up the "exclusive pumpers" group. They have tons and tons of tips for pumping, making time to pump, increasing supply, etc. I wound up exclusively pumping for my eldest because she refused to latch. If you still have milk coming out, I think you might be able to increase supply. But everyone's body is different. If you try it all and it just doesn't work, don't feel guilty, you are still a wonderful mom!

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    5. Ina, go to babycenter.com and look up the group for "exclusive pumpers". It's full of tips and tricks for pumping and increasing supply. If you still have milk coming out, I don't think it's too late, but everyone's body is different, and if it doesn't work, don't feel guilty because you are still a great mom! I would say your best bet at this point, if you can, is to pump for 15 minutes every three hours, around the clock. Fenugreek supplements can also boost supply a lot.

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  26. The first time I ever saw a momma breastfeed was when I was a young teenager. That made such a big impression on me. She was my cousin and she made it look so effortless. What really made me decide to breastfeed was when I was listening to an interview on the radio from a pediatrician that made the statement "Puppies and kittens drink dog and cat milk. Calves drink cow's milk and so it makes sense that babies should drink momma's milk." I was hooked. I was blessed with three children and I breastfed all three. My oldest was born while I had a job and my supervisor made sure I had time set aside to pump at work. I can relate to most everything in this blog. I don't regret one moment of it.

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    1. That is such a great point! I'm so glad you had a positive breastfeeding experience!

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  27. Thank you - makes me feel like I am not so alone!! Especially the weight gain issue part! All of my babies took forever to flourish on their "percentile chart".

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  28. This is awesome! perfectly captured the love/hate relationship I have with breastfeeding.

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  29. Yay! I love breast milk for babies; there's no more comforting feeling than knowing you're giving your babe the best thing for them. I breastfed mine, and I one hundred percent support breastfeeding mamas! I guess my only "thing" with it is when breastfeeding advocacy turns from bringing awareness to having a vendetta. Breastfeeding in public is one thing, but purposefully pulling your boob out to make other people purposefully uncomfortable and prove a point is another. It's just like any other type of advocacy: they are made mostly of well-meaning, balanced people trying to do the right thing with an unfortunate few who have something to prove and no grace to go with it. I love the balanced and insightful viewpoint of this post. Best of luck to all nursing mamas!

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    1. I've been breastfeeding for 15 months now, and I've been around lots of other nursing mamas. I have never, not once, seen a mama pull a boob out in order to make someone else uncomfortable. I've seen them pull a boob out to feed their child.

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    2. I agree that I myself have never seen anyone purposelly feed their baby to offend anyone, but I have seen mothers feed their babies without feeling they need to cover up, and I am in awe of them honestly! I think mothers need to do what feels most comfortable to them at the time. And I think showing grace on both sides is a wonderful thing! Thank you for your comment and encouragement!!

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    3. I loved breast feeding and my babies were sweet little puggie babies.Some people can be idiots!

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  30. Once when I was brestfeeding my youngest, her "big" 2.5 year old brother, brought a doll into the living room, sat down, lifted his shirt and nursed the doll on his belly button. Still makes me laugh. He is now the father of 3 and his wife is a great breast feeding Mama.

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  31. I laughed so hard through so many of these salutes, because it is so true! Breastfeeding can be so hard when you don't have support and comprehension. Just the other day, my uncle came in and I was discretely nursing my son.... ran out yelling, COVER THAT THING UP! I don't know what he wanted me to cover up, because you couldn't see anything!

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  32. This was great, it gave me wife a nice pickup. We're in day 5! It's a challenge.

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  33. I loved this! Thanks so much for posting. And the cartoons are hilarious!

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  34. Thank you for the tears of laughter, then tears of joy. I will cherish the years I nursed each of my children forever.

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  35. i'm still between tears & smiles... Thank you so much for writing this. i struggled with my son's low weight for long. i cant count the no. of times i thought of starting formula,and finally started it when Nate was 6 & a half months old. till then, it was like feeding 24 * 7!
    Nobody could say it better all that a breastfeeding mother goes through than you have. ur son is so special... as is all our babies who have been breastfed - because they are loved unconditionally.

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  36. Read this as I'm nursing my teething 4mo old who also has a cold. Many laughs, smiles, and tears as I read this and related far too well! She wasn't gaining weight in the beginning and it broke my heart when we had to suppliment until I could get my supply up. It was countless hours of nursing, pumping, lactation consultants, and doctor visits. I could have given up at any time, but I (and she) stuck to it. Eventually it got better. I'm completely in love with her, and cherish this amazing time that we are able share together. ♥

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  37. Thank you do much for this. I both laughed and cried having been in many of these moments myself!

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  38. This made me laugh and cry. Simply amazing....THANK YOU!!!!

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  39. This made me laugh and cry...simply amazing. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!

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  40. This made me laugh and cry. Simply amazing....THANK YOU!!!!

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  41. A man's poit of view:
    1. This was great, a little sappy at times, but I'm not a woman for forgive my machismo for the moment.
    2. Public feeding: why is this an issue? Seriously, no one gets upset when someone walks through the mall sucking down a milkshake or frappaccino, that shit came out of a tit too. There's a kid on the end of it, its not out because she is trying to signal to you or your husband that she wants to mate with either of you. To the lady who said she doesn't want to see them, or here children or husband to see them: quit going to church and open your mind to other ways of thinking. You have obviously let others dictate the way your brain works for most of your life, you need to take control of it and think for yourself. How could any of you possibly be harmed physically or psychologically from seeing a tit with a kid stuck on it. Heaven forbid you should walk by during unlatching, you might see some areola or even a whole nipple! Holy shit what would happen then? Cats and dogs living together in matrimony I tell you, it would be the end of society as we know it! Get over yourself, uncurl your hair, unpaint your nails, take your silly housewives of wherever you live jewelry off and take the super high heels off. Go look in the mirror and realize you are a human, an woman, a mother, not whatever it is that made you react like that to the FEEDING of a CHILD the way it is supposed to be done. Relax, enjoy life and quit letting your thought crime induced moral confusion ruin things for you and those around you. Seriously, CTFD. Google that if you don't know what it means.
    3. Breastfeeding rocks!!!! I do it whenever I can! Just kidding. Sorta. Great post, great cartoons, and thanks for posting! Titty Libre! That's my motto!

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    1. Ha! Best comment ever.
      But I must add:
      Here's a solute to all the women who could not breastfeed. I honor the women who's hearts broke when they couldn't make it work.
      Here's to the woman who made the choice to formula feed regardless of the fear that their child might be sicker, less intelligent or less attached to their mother.
      Here's to the moms who are guilt ridden because they have to formula feed. I honor them and tell them they too deserve a pat on the back because, damn it, they love their babies just as much. They are not less of a mother. For every tear shed in the formula isle trying to choose "the best one" I solute you. For the pain you feel watching a breastfeeding baby/mama feed effortlessly, I solute you. Let your voices be heard mamas because I know that its not easy to read these happy BFing posts. Hugs to the formula moms. You too are doing the best thing for your baby...loving them with your entire being.

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    2. Loved this comment. I would have liked a salute to FF moms when I was in that stage with my twins. Thanks for recognizing how hard all mommies work, how much we all love our babies, regardless of how we feed them. I certainly love all three of my children more than words can express, and they each were fed a different way as babies. I have babies in heaven I will never get to feed, and I'd give anything to spend a few moments doing so. There are more important things than how babies are fed, and this was only a post celebrating the way I am currently blessed to feed my baby. :)

      Thanks again for throwing a shout out to the FF moms, as I am also in that camp! :)

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    3. Thank you so much for remembering the mothers who are just doing the best they can, even if BF didn't work for them. I shed countless tears while trying to feed my baby and it just would not work for me. I cried for a week straight when I had to give my son formula. I still get emotional and sad when I think about my son not getting those amazing nutrients through breastmilk. However, my son is super happy, healthy and growing fabulously. He is going to be ok, and one day I will have forgiven myself for not being able to provide that to my son. I hope that one day judgement can be removed from the equation of mothers, and that we can all love and support one another in the calling we have to raise children in these hard times. KA

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    4. Thanks for these comments. I too was not able to breast feed as I had to begin chemo as soon as my baby was born. It was heartbreaking to give up that experience, particularly since I had planned on it and prepared for it. While I so appreciate the struggle breastfeeding mothers go through, seeing the (seemingly) constant articles about the triumph that it is to succeed, despite my total agreement that it is indeed a triumph, still hurts. I'm always grateful when someone remembers that not all mothers can breastfeed; for some it is a heartbreaking loss, and yet we're no less loving or devoted.

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  42. I second the opinion where there are some militant mothers who are so agressive with the breastfeeding. I completely understand that women shouldn't have to cover up if they don't want to, but let's get serious. Front pew of church? Come on. If the choice is to go to the bathroom vs. front pew. Front pew wins. If the choice is front pew and an empty lobby. uh...hello --- empty lobby.

    Also - as someone who could not breastfeed (I take thyroid medication), I got a little tired of the overly anti-formula crowd. Everyone should do what they want/need to do.

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  43. I am man, father of six (now grandpa of 16) and a Registered Nurse. All my kids breastfed without any difficulties on their part, though my wife did have some of the expected issue- a little nipple soreness, mastitis once, etc. I would not have traded the experience for them and for me for anything. They all prospered without any childhood health issues. While completing nursing school I worked nights in a hospital new born/post partum unit and was occasionally called out to help new mothers with nursing issues because none of the older nurses had breastfed and were clueless with nursing problems. To this day, it still makes me a sad when friends and co-workers choose not to breastfeed, not being judgmental, just knowing what they and their babes are missing.

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  44. Wow! Interesting read! :)

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  45. I have nursed an infant in the front pew situation, but pretty much no one even realized it because I DID try to be discreet. I know most nursing moms are not trying to call attention to themselves, but let's be honest here . . . there are women who want to "make a statement" when they breastfeed in public which actually only hurts the cause of promoting it's acceptance. I breastfed all four of my children and have always promoted it, but I have seen women who were so blatantly exposing their breast I was embarrassed. It made me feel it wasn't as much about their child needing to nurse as much as their need to call attention to themselves and then complaining about people staring.

    Thank you for the wonderful article though because it brought back wonderful memories of those little eyes locking with mine while they broke into a grin while nursing ! Nothing else can compare to the joy that brought me!

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  46. Freaking Awesome and Hilarious Read For All!! Nail On Head

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  47. Love and thanks to you from "the lactating catholic" (TLC). Been there. And still there. So glad not to be alone! :)

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  48. I am a breastfeeding mother, and my almost one year old daughter likes to 'dance' all the time, including when I'm feeding her. I'm sure some people think I'm trying to make a statement, but in truth I'm just trying to keep her from ripping off my nipple. Be very careful judging others, since you really don't know all of their experience.

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  49. Great blog, but "your baby is not gaining weight at the perfectly perfect "normal" rate all pediatricians came together and decided on so that they could strike fear and guilt into any breastfeeding mother whose child does not meet this perfectly perfect timeline" Really, pediatricians spend years in school and training to HELP children and their parents. We are breastfeeding advocates! Breastfeeding is best for baby and mama! We work with lactation consultants, we share personal experiences, we work to empower, educate, and hope every time we see a new nursing mama that we can help them! While certainly, as with any job that employs humans, there are individual pediatricians that may not share these views, but as a whole, pediatricians are very much on the side of breastfeeding mamas and it is offensive to suggest that we would ever have the purposeful goal of causing fear and guilt in a new mom!!!
    From, a pediatrician in private practice for 7 years, over 3 years of which have also been spent nursing 3 babies.

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    1. This comment made me laugh because my sister is a pediatrician! Some of my very best friends and those I respect the most on earth are doctors and I more than anyone know they are extremely well trained professionals who only want the best for mommies and babies. :) This particular quote was of course made in jest, and only meant to reflect the way a mommy can feel when her baby isn't gaining at the "normal" rate.

      I'm sorry you were offended! I love pediatricians everywhere, and especially those who encourage breastfeeding mamas! Thank you for all you do, I wish every doctor was as supportive of breastfeeding as you are! :) Thanks for your comment!

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    2. I breast fed both my children and I covered with a blanket most of the time. I think it is fine. They are not a sex toy!

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  50. I am a dad of 3 daughters and my fantastic wife breastfed all 3 of them. She had to go through countless hours of feeding, sleepless nights and pumping out milk at the office and dirty school toilets. She often jokes that I should be more appreciative of what she did. Perhaps even pay her the cost of saving milk powder bills I might otherwise have incurred! But jokes aside, reading this reminds me of how much she sacrificed and how much my kids have been so blessed by all she has done. Thank you Lynette, my wonderful wife. We love you!

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    1. Yay for a supportive daddy! Thanks for your sweet shout out to your wife!

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  51. Jesus bless u exceedingly, abundantly n above all u ask n imagine for writing this beautiful article, dearest. Although I was pumping exclusively n supplemented partially w FM, i experienced some of the pains mentioned which made me stop in 6 months. I felt the inner conflict nonetheless but I trusted Jesus tt whatever i had thus far fed my precious baby was sufficient. Ur post brought tears n memories too. Thank u n happy breastfeeding week to u too! God bless! ;) *hugs*

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  52. Reading this at 2am while trying to get my 10 day old to latch and getting ready to pump for the millionth time to help with my low supply....and now dying laughing!! Love you, karen, and your humor and honesty...and how passionate you are about this! Don't know what I wouldve done this past week without your advice and encouragement!! Youre the best and this has got to be one of my favorite posts you've written!! :)

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  53. Reading this at 2am while trying to get my 10 day old to latch and getting ready to pump for the millionth time to help with my low supply....and now dying laughing!! Love you, karen, and your humor and honesty...and how passionate you are about this! Don't know what I wouldve done this past week without your advice and encouragement!! Youre the best and this has got to be one of my favorite posts you've written!! :)

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  54. I love this! Thank you :)

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  55. I cried and laughed through the tears as I read this! I breastfeed my 4 boys and the last one until he was 16 months, because I wasn't ready to be done forever! As hard as breastfeeding can be at the beginning, I wouldn't trade it for the world! The bond made with your baby as you provide them with what they need can never be broken! Before I had kids and would see or hear of women breastfeeding their 4 year old I thought it was the craziest thing EVER! But now I totally understand it! Thanks for your article!

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  56. Love this! Thanks for a great read. I had very successful nursing journeys with my first 3 babies and just finally got my 8 month old to switch back to nursing after 8long months of pumping by hand because she wasn't getting enough and losing too much weight. Oh how I've prayed for this, and I'm so thankful that I get to enjoy this time with her, especially since she's our last!

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  57. Aw by the end I can say this is SO SWEET!! however I'm recently married and I was mostly scared throughout the whole read =] But I got a kick out of the comics.. hahaha
    And in all honestly even I was annoyed on society's ignorance on breastfeeding in public! Very interesting perspective...

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  58. Happy Breastfeeding Week to you too...my daughter is slowly weening off and embarking to the solids and I'm truthfully having mixed feelings about it. They grow up so fast but I am thankful that I was one of those Mamas who stick to it to the very end...damn the society ignorance :)

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  59. Excellent Karen!! I read your comments about breastfeeding while my students were busy reading their books, and I burst out laughing at one point... which always attracts the attention of junior highers. I didn't share.... Hee Hee. I loved it though. It reminded me of one thing you did not mention, which was those times when you're racing home, or you've been out and about for longer than usual and you suddenly think of your little one, and you better hope your nursing pads hold! Because it's about to blow! And speaking of pads... never could make those tidy circles work with any of my blouses. But all of it completely worth it! Thanks for sharing your thoughts with so many. Clearly we all want to read you!!!

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  60. It makes me happy that so many moms are able to nurse as they want. I wasn't able to for a couple of reasons, and was disappointed. Luckily my daughter is healthy and happy even though she wasn't breastfed, though. I used to get annoyed at people who looked down upon me because my daughter was fed from a bottle; always knew, though, that the judging went both ways!
    Happy BFD to you all :)

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  61. Thank you so much! This was fantastic. I laughed through so much, and quielty remembered the problems that I experienced with my daughter 30 years ago.
    I now work as a Postpartum Doula and Breastfeeding Counselor. Many of my clients sucessfully breastfeed without any issues and then there are those that need some encouragement or simply give up and decide to formaula feed. I love all my clients and am here non-judgemental. I help those that want to breastfeed and those that choose to formula feed.
    God Bless all of the mamas that were blessed with having a baby of there own. And to all those mamas that have been fortunate enough to adopt. Nurturing your baby is not only done with breastfeeding. Hug and cuddles, smiles and laughter, care and loving. God bless all of the partners that have stood by and supported these mamas too.
    Thanks again for this blog. God Bless you and your Jonsey, and your family.

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  62. What a hysterical article! Laughed myself into delirium just about! I'm a mom of twins myself, almost 10 months. Still at it for breastfeeding, though my supply is starting to decline. That one clip of the tot still pulling at the boob, that is SOOOO my lil girls! For whatever reason they like to flop from the back to their belly and back up while continuing to tug and suck! Oh and yes, they have those sharp lil baby teeth now too! OUCH! Anyone else have the experience of their tots deciding to put their buts in the air and dance with their legs while suckling away?

    I relate 100% to this article! My first girl I was forced to stop by 8 months, as my supply just would not continue, and my daughter just was not content enough with what was coming out. I tried everything! Diet changes, diet supplements, drinking more water, pumping frequently, finally prescription meds. *sigh* Still am bummed I had to switch out to formula with her, but all the snuggling and bonding we had way back then - I'm glad to say make us all that much closer now! I am hoping to get to at least 1 year for my twins! Two more months to go, and we'll see from there! And interestingly enough - they have quite the happy supply of milk! :) Don't know what made the difference - but I'm happy that these two lil ones are getting the best they can from me!!!

    Feel no shame for bottle feeding. I had to for my daughter, and while I was not able to make the goal I had wanted - I'm still proud of what I have been able to do.

    Covering up - well here's my own two lil cents: onlookers should cover your heads in tents and feel the heat for yourself before making a mom do it to her own kid! My kids just won't tolerate a cover at this point. They will yank them off their heads the first chance they get - and to attempt to pin my kid down so that i can be covered. Not happening, unless you want to hear the wails of pain and suffering. Which is more important - a peaceful meal/social outing with your friends, or the need to ensure a woman is hiding her kid under a tent? Not that I'm going to come right on over to your table and force you to stare at my kid breastfeeding or anything right? Ok that's all I have to say.

    Happy bottling, breasting, formula-ing to all and to all a good day!



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  63. My daughter saw your post today and forwarded it to me. I had WONDERFUL (mostly) nursing experiences with all three of my children and I cherish the memories of those times. Thanks so much for posting this; it is funny and TRUE! (LOVE all of the cartoon clips :D.) I especially appreciate the irony of a society who has no problem with and actually encourages women to display as much of their breasts (and their entire bodies) as possible while expressing outrage at mothers who "dare" to breastfeed their babies in public. Bravissima to ALL mothers and especially to those who breastfeed!!

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  64. I am SO GLAD that more moms are being proactive with breast-feeding. I could only nurse my baby for six months due to a disease I have that makes me very dehydrated anyway, but I tried so hard! I would lug my pumping equipment to work where they had an office set up for my use every two hours to pump--I would label it and put it in the company freezer (you should have heard the comments when THOSE were discovered by others who had no idea I was breast-feeding!). I had to fight family, church members, and strangers whenever my daughter decided it was feeding time. I used a feeding shawl to hide my skin to try to keep the disapproving stares to a minimum. The worst was when we walked the mall in Nashville--very large place with restrooms and lounges to make phone calls--but NO privacy for nursing mothers. I ended up sitting in the middle of the mall (shawl cover on) as my little one appeased her appetite. Someone complained and I was approached, and I gave them town and country on not having even ONE lounge for nursing mothers to go!! Not sure if they've changed it or not, but my baby grew up strong, healthier than her cousin (a week younger than her and bottle fed who gets sick ALL the time), and I don't regret nursing one bit! I miss that bonding sometimes. I laugh at the memories of when she was really hungry she'd open her mouth, turn her head toward me, and shake her head like a fish (earning her the nickname of Little Bass Fish). You go Moms who nurse! For those who are undecided, I urge you to at least try--the experience is awesome for BOTH of you!

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  65. You rock! I was able to nurse for six months, then had to quit due to my disease that was making me dehydrated. I felt shammed into always covering with a shawl when I nursed and wasn't strong enough to just be proud enough to "whip it out" when she needed to eat. There even was a time I visited the mall in Nashville and discovered while they have lounges to call other people, and restrooms, there were no suitable places to sit and nurse your child. So I sat in the middle of the mall on a massage chair (shawl covering exposed skin) but someone STILL complained. When I was approached I angrily told the administrator of the mall that if they had consideration for providing a place for nursing moms I wouldn't have to be out in the "traffic" feeding my child. This horrible woman said "You can go to the bathroom", to which I told her "Your bathrooms have no chairs to sit on but toilets and I'm NOT scaring my child who is eating with the sound of flushing and hurting my butt trying to balance on a toilet seat without falling in!" To those moms who nurse, ROCK ON! TO those undecided, think about this: my daughter and her cousin were born a week apart. I nursed her for six months--her cousin was bottle fed. My daughter hardly ever gets sick--her cousin has already had multiple illnesses, some landing him in the hospital and even a surgery to drain fluid from his ears. I HIGHLY recommend nursing. Give it a try!

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  66. amazingly true and hilarious salute to us nursing moms. (I'm typing this with one hand.....wanna guess why?) loved it!

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  67. And to those of us who tried and cried because our bodies betrayed our wishes and did not produce milk? Nope, no salute there. Of course breast is best, of course it's cheaper, of course it's perfectly formulated for our babies - IF WE CAN PRODUCE IT! But not everyone can, even those who WANT to with every ounce of their being. I fully support breastfeeding and wish everyone the best with it. But one time, just one freaking time, I'd love to see an article like this just even recognize that some people are physically unable to do it...

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  68. Wish I had found this when I was breastfeeding. Very cute and funny and down to earth!

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  69. My daughters are grown and one their own, I breastfed them all. The oldest, I started on solids at four months in an attempt to get her to sleep longer......she weighed 16 pounds at six months. Her two sisters were exclusively breast fed, and weight 16 pounds at four months! My husband was in the hospital when the youngest was six months old, and one of his nurses was astounded that you could feed a child just breast milk and she would grow! They all had shiny hair, soft skin and bright brown eyes. The last two nursed past the toddler stage, and I nursed the second through my pregnancy with the third (who weighed 8 lbs 8 oz at birth). Now my youngest is a stay at home mom of an almost two year old son and expecting another son during the holidays! She breastfed her first and will breast feed her second also. I sewed her a nursing cover, it is two layers of cotton.....Hopefully it was not too warm under there!!

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  70. Thank you so much!!!! This post had me cracking up... and tearing up. Thank you for taking the time to write this.

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  71. thumbs up to all in the same boat :-)

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  72. This is such an encouraging post! I was unable to breastfeed my first baby, due to complications after delivery. I'm hoping to breastfeed my next one though! I'm looking forward to trying breastfeeding again now. :)

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  73. Thank you for this poignant and reaffirming piece! You captured all the ups and downs of it. Bravo!

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  74. Apparently World Breast Feeding Week was the same week as the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. I ventured out once in the midst of it (thank God I did not have to go buy formula!!) and saw a young woman in body paint instead of a shirt. I wonder how the same people who were taking pictures with her would have reacted if I'd tried to breastfeed my baby in front of them.

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  75. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you for this post. Yes, I laughed and agreed with much of what you wrote. I especially loved the cartoon of the crafty momma. (That gave me ideas... lol I'm currently BF and I'm also conflicted about weaning, and frankly... I'm just not ready. Thank you for these thoughts. They were humorous and yet empowering. By the way, you have a lovely family.

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  76. Thank you for writing this <3

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  77. I.Needed.This. My baby is six weeks old today (having her a.m. Swing Time while I gulp breakfast and stagger around trying to get a few things done). Feeding her is a challenge and a joy at the same time. This was a good laugh for my morning!! I can so relate!!!

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  78. Good stuff! Keep it up. It's a positive message and gets people rightly orientated.

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  79. I cried and laughed reading this blog! I was determined to breastfeed exclusively and tried EVERYTHING for 5 days. My baby wasn't eating and she became very jaundice (levels at 17). So I ended up supplementing with formula and hating myself. I was severely depressed. Later I was diagnosed with not having enough tissue. Can you ladies tell me about your experiences with jaundice? I'm planning on baby #2 and will try breastfeeding again. I will use a SNS with formula but unsure when I should start. After two or three days of just breast? Don't want to end up hospitalizing my baby like last time.

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  80. Karen, though we are not in the same religion but I'm so touched about your writing. Some people may find it hilarious(no offence) but for me, every single words makes me wanna cry. I enjoy breastfeeding until now and hope doing so until my boy reaches 2 years. Every details you mentioned are sooo true and no doubt that we are superwomen. I salute you and other breastfeeding mama.

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  81. I still, all these years later, remember nursing my sons in the middle of the night and feeling like I was part of a chain that went back to the beginning of time. No equipment no hassle just me the kid and the rocker. We did not have "Boppy pillows" or any of the current stuff. It was simple and pure and there were times it almost made me cry because I felt so connected to all the women before and after me who did/willdo the same thing. I would not have missed it for anything.

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  82. God yes! I use to pump in the principals office and an old janitors closet at school! And David would carry it home because he got out earlier than me. His Physics teacher went through the bag one day after hearing a joke about it being drugs and was speechless when he found breastmilk :) All I can say is that he was warned! Proud to say I nursed my daughter up to her second birthday!

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  83. I'm now a pregnant, soon to be mother of my first child.
    Like every parent, I m wishing for my child to grow up healthy and happy,
    But honestly, I have a lot of limitations.
    I'm worried about the sensation or pain il go through with lactating,
    Im also abit worried about the delivery process,
    As I read through the blog, it makes me feel so proud of all the mommies out there...
    Just that on my part, I really feel a little stress..
    Not sure if these thoughts are normal,

    Please advise fellow mommies... :)

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    1. Congratulations on your first pregnancy! What an exciting time for you. Just wanted to tell you that what you are feeling is totally normal! All of us moms tend to worry about those things, and we can be so hard on ourselves! I wish I could tell you that the fears go away when the baby arrives, but honestly it just bring a whole new set of worries that continue on as long as we are parents. I think that if you are planning to BF make sure that you find people that will be supportive and helpful to you. Le Leche League is a great resource, I am sure you can google it to find someone near you. But if you do end up having issues, and just find that you are not able to BF, do not let it get you down or make you feel like you are a failure! We need to do what is best for our babies, and it's not always what we expect it to be. I was not able to BF my daughter after all due to issues, but she thrived on the formula, to this day she has never had a fever (she's 3 now), and she is a smart cookie;)I think it is important for us to follow our maternal instincts. Also as far as your labor and delivery, go in with a set plan, but be prepared to throw it out the window;) Some births go according to plan, others go the complete opposite way. Just remember to breathe, and know that it is all worth it in the end when you hold your precious baby in your arms. Sending prayers your way, good luck with everything! <3

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  84. Wow... every paragraph was a deja vu... coz as you can guess... i am a breastfeeding mom...
    That was a delight to read and evey single word was oh so true! Thank you so much for writing it... this piece deserves applause

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  85. I nursed all seven of mine. There was no instruction from the doctor, nurse, or my mom. If new mothers could know that the first six weeks might be a little hellish, but after that it's amazing, I think more would stick with it. The LaLeche League helped me a lot.

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  86. This made me laugh as well as tear up. =) I had excruciating pain during the first few weeks with my 3. (Short nipples) I am still nursing my soon to be 7 month old and he is so snuggly when he nurses. I love it. He is my last (unless God has other plans and pulls a fast one on me lol) and I know when he weans himself it will be a sad day. Thank you for this wonderful post!

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  87. Love this! Thanks for the laughter & tears. I've been done BFing for many years now, but I remember all those feelings so clearly. Thanks for making us feel like heroes.

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  88. One last salute: I salute all the mothers out there that had to completely revamp their diets for months, if not years, when their LO's were born with food allergies and/or sensitivities. It can completely turn your world upside down, having to read every single food label. It can eat up more and more of your precious time making everything from scratch when you realize that everything you ate before you gave birth had dairy, wheat, soy, or egg in it. You could have thrown in the towel and gotten the $50/can ultra sensitive prescription formula, but you stuck with it, anyway.

    I salute me, for sticking with it for 14 months when I found myself in that exact circumstance.

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    1. I salute you, too. I'm in the same situation now. Only two months in. But that is DEFINITELY something to salute. It's like you climbed Everest 14 times. Good job!

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  89. I am pregnant with my first, and I found this to be a little terrifying. But, at the same time, really makes me feel more confident with my decision to breastfeed when the time comes.

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    1. Hi Kendra - please don't be terrified. I've done all this and more (pumping in airport bathrooms because I travel for work, for instance). And apart from the few times I really thought I was going to lose my mind, I found it totally worth it, and I believe my son did as well. Congratulations on your pregnancy - it only gets better.

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  90. I haven't nursed a baby in 16 years, but reading your comments brought it all back. I'm so glad that I was blessed to be able to do that for my kids. They're all teens now, and it's good to remember that we were once so close.

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  91. Your post brought back mammories. . . uh, MEMORIES! I breastfed our two sons, now 22 and 19, with great difficulty at first but a very good pediatrician and wonderful LLL friends who supported me. When our youngest was 5 we adopted our daughter at 6 months old and chose not breastfeed, especially since she had been bottle fed since birth. While I missed the breastfeeding moments we decided to focus on the good -- dad and brothers could help with the feeding, but still had to hold her very close and cuddly, focusing on her. Now she is 14 y.o. and close to all of us. And my relationship as her mom is so beautiful. I'm spoiled by my God!

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  92. Your post brought back mammories. . . uh, MEMORIES! I breastfed our two sons, now 22 and 19, with great difficulty at first but a very good pediatrician and wonderful LLL friends who supported me. When our youngest was 5 we adopted our daughter at 6 months old and chose not breastfeed, especially since she had been bottle fed since birth. While I missed the breastfeeding moments we decided to focus on the good -- dad and brothers could help with the feeding, but still had to hold her very close and cuddly, focusing on her. Now she is 14 y.o. and close to all of us. And my relationship as her mom is so beautiful. I'm spoiled by my God!

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  93. Thank you! Last few weeks as a new mom attempting to breastfeed, there hasn't been much to laugh about and in fact after several lactation consultants (and 2 more booked), I have been feeling rather bedraggled. Having read this and the comics, I laughed and laughed and laughed. So thank you for making me laugh about this arduous but incredibly bonding time enjoyable for the moment. I will read it again when I'm feeling defeated again.

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  94. My breast-feeding days are years behind me now, but LOVE this! I echo your salute!

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  95. My breast-feeding days are now well behind me, but I still LOVE this. I echo your salute!

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  96. Truly enjoyed the post, great sense of humor and the cartoons had me laughing out loud. I nursed three daughters and now am thankful that my oldest has chosen the same. While it's been 20 years since, everything you mention is spot on, I too echo your salute! Thanks again. :-)

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  97. Holy cow, hilarity!!!! So terribly, terribly funnily true!!

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  98. Love, Love, Love your post and all the comments. Our daughter is now 33, our son 28. I took a 6-month leave of absence just to breast feed each of them. Breast pumps back then were retched and basically useless. I wanted to keep nursing our son before and after work, but once he started on formula and a bottle, he would not nurse. I was heart broken. Went to my bathroom one night, turned my nipple up and gave it a good suckle to see if I was still producing milk. When I looked up, I saw a set of six-year old eyes peering through the crack in the door, followed by, "Can I try it, Mommy?" Right or wrong, I said, "Sure." Her one and only swallow was followed by, "That tastes yucky!" She is trying to have our first grandchild now. She is the one who sent me this link. I pray she can successfully carry and breast feed our grandbabies!

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  99. I liked this so much I bookmarked it for later reading when I'm feeling down. Nursing really is the best and worst - seriously. But I wouldn't do it any other way!

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  100. This is wonderful. I gave birth 7 months ago for the 1st time and I am nursing. I wish I would have fun this sooner!!!

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  101. Thank you a hundred times over for this! I'm currently breast feeding my 3rd child who is 3 months old. When I read this I laughed so hard I cried. Then I cried because it's all so true. Us breastfeeding Mom's go through hell to give our children "manna". Thank you for this post. It means a lot to me.

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  102. I laughed and I cried! And I'm only two months into this adventure. :)

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  103. Oh, my goodness. I laughed and I cried! And I'm only two months in to this adventure. :)

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  104. This is awesome! I am currently breast feeding my 2nd child who is 3 months old. Reading this really brought mixed feelings - laughter & tears because it translated very well of what I am going thru! Hugsss!

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  105. love it, breastfed 4 kids for a year each (give or take), remember crying the one night my husband was going to feed the baby but split the liquid gold on the counter and I had to wake up anyway. Years of working and not making enough but longing to. I miss it so much. it was a fast 6 years where I was either pregnant, nursing, or both at the same time.

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  106. Love it! Breastfed 4 kids for about a year each. I miss it dearly. Still remember the night my husband was going to let me sleep and spilled the liquid gold on the counter and I had to wake up anyway. The years of working and nursing were so much fun, not. I refused to buy those giant boobie covers. It was a fast 6 years of being pregnant, nursing, or both at the same time.

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  107. Sending love all the way from Malaysia! Thank you for writing this.. :)

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  108. I'm one of the "pumping/EBF" moms who totes the pump to work. It is truly rewarding and boring at the same time being stuck in a closet pumping for 15min at a time ..LOL. On the other hand I have been blessed beyond belief on being able to donate milk to 3 other mommas as well as enough for my little babe, if you get the chance to be able to donate.. DO IT!! it is rewarding. This article depicted EVERY situation I could think of and thank you Karen for bringing to light all the stigma involved. Blessings to you and your entire family!

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  109. I know I won't say anything anyone above hasn't already said but I LOVED reading this & will be sharing it with my hubby for a few laughs. While he does bring me water he hasn't washed any of the pumping parts since he did the one time in the hospital. We didn't even know we needed to boil them! We had a tongue tie issue & that was the only thing I knew to keep things going & help with the pain. I both teared & an laughed as I read your tribute. Thank you. ***hugs***

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  110. It bring tears to my eyes and lumps in my throat reading your entry, sister. YES, I agree with u, SALUTE the breastfeeding mamas. I, myself cannot breastfeed my only child because of some constraint... To the breastfeeding mums, continue the noble work..


    Sincerely,
    sakinahmk@gmail.com

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  111. Thank you. I cried out loud while reading this. It is so important to hear that breastfeeding struggles are universal. I feel encouraged and empowered.

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  112. Another Grandma saying," Nurse On!!" Proud and blessed to have been able to nurse my children, and thrilled that my second grandchild is cooperating with his Mommy and breastfeeding, as my first grandchild did not, and my daughter pumped for 7 months to provide her with breast milk. I Celebrate all of you!

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  113. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  114. Laughed and cried! This is great! As I come to the end of breastfeeding my second child (our last) I can relate to this! Breastfeeding has been one of the MOST amazing experiences of my life :)

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  115. What a great, timeless article! I nursed all 4 and wouldn't have traded the experience for anything. Thanks for the memories!

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  116. This was awesome, and I really appreciate your mentioning moms who pump. My Punkin had low muscle tone and other health issues which made nursing impossible, but I pumped milk for her for her first year. Not having a nursing experience broke my heart, but I was so happy that I could provide for her that way and I believe it helped improve her health :D

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  117. Thank you! I definitely feel saluted this morning, which is something I needed. :) I am a mother of 4. My first baby, I was under the impression, that I could nurse and do formula. In the end formula took over, and I was very sad to stop nursing at 4 months. My second baby, ended up in the NICU for a week, so I had to pump, which made it an extremely difficult experience, trying to get her to latch on correctly, and to get my body regulated, but after 2 months of trying to pump and supplement with formula, one night, I just decided to sit for as long as I had to, to get my body to fill her up and satisfied, and I ended up being able to cut out bottles completely until she weaned herself at 10 months.
    My 3rd baby, I was bound and determined that I would use, No binkies, and No Bottles! We did just that, and my little girl learned to suck her fingers, (a great natural binky), and we nursed until she weaned herself at 18 months.
    I am now doing the same with my 11 month old son. He has learned to suck his knuckle, and has never even touched a bottle. Its a lot of hard work, and I am to the point, where I don't use a cover anymore (I am still a little descrete, by covering his back and head gently with a thin blanket, when we are around the men), and I nurse anywhere and everywhere. We are shooting to nurse for 18 months again, or longer if he chooses. :) Happy breastfeeding week to you too!!

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  118. As the father of 7, all of whom were lovingly breastfed, this post made me smile through and through while recalling those many wonderful hours playing the supporting role of carrying baby back and forth between crib and mommy, burping, middle of the night diaper changes, pump cleaning, expressed milk refrigerator delivery man, and more. :-)

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  119. As a breast feeding hormonal mother I also laughed, cried and related to almost every comment. Thank you for your eloquent words!

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  120. Thank you for this post! I am a breast feeding mama of a 3 month old and I was having a horrible day at work. I hated being away from my baby and my friend emailed me this link. It made my day better. It is hard to keep up with the milk demand with pumping enough for the future but saving enough in the boobies for present baby. You made my day!

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  121. Yes, yes, YES! I breastfed my 5 year old for over a year! Best thing I have ever done in my 29 years of life! God Bless!

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  122. Ah! You said it all! Thank you!

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  123. I'm currently nursing my 4th baby and this post brought tears to my eyes. Yes, it is worth it! Thank you, thank you, thank you!

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  124. Love Love this!!! I had to laugh out loud to the husband saying " no need in crying over spilled milk"!! Last week I just got home from work and went to put my breastmilk in the fridge only to find the bag had busted. And it was like 8oz. I was so mad and sad!! And my husband was there while I was venting about it and he literally said there is no need in crying over spilled milk! :) I breastfeed my first son and now my 3 month old son. There is nothing like that feeling of bonding with your babies!

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  125. Very nice! I laughed and cried through this. Thank you for writing this! When I finally get my breastfeeding story written I would like to use this as a related article, if that is okay?
    Jenny

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  126. I struggled nursed my daughter up until about 5 weeks, when we found out the reason she screamed and flailed around when I nursed her was that she's *actually* lactose intolerant. I was so torn -- I had had HUGE low supply issues with her, and she was hurting, but I had the thought stuck in my head that I *had* to nurse her. I bawled when we started her on soy formula that day, but she took to it immediately, and she grew and thrived. She's now 21 months old. I don't regret a thing.

    With my son, it was completely different. He was born at 36w6d, and was immediately diagnosed with RDS when he was born; he was in the NICU the entire time we were there pp (luckily he recovered enough in time for us to leave 2 days later), so the nurses formula-fed him, while I tried so hard to pump out the three or 4 drops of colostrum in a half-hour pumping session. I was terrified that I'd have the low-supply issues again, and he'd be intolerant like his sister; I was upset because I wasn't able to feed him because of everything that was happening... I was allowed to nurse him for the first time when he was about 36 hours old.
    I'd love to say everything was perfect after that, but life happens. My son was tongue-tied. After 3 episodes of mastitis (the first one, my temperature rose to 104.6 and hovered between there and 102 for 4 days... imagine dealing with that and a 1-month-old and an almost 15-month-old!), our pediatrician finally gave the green light (at 3 months) to get ds' frenulum trimmed back. I'd already been pumping 4/5 times since that first infection at 1 month, terrified I was going to get another one (I did), but still wanting to nurse and bond with my son. It took 3 months to get an appointment to get ds' frenulum trimmed back, and after that 3rd infection, I switched to pumping exclusively. I plan on continuing to pump, and weaning at around a year. He is currently 7 months old, and is doing just fine bottle-feeding mommy milk.


    Sorry this comment is so long, just wanted to finally share my experiences somewhere.

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  127. Thanks so much for sharing this! I'm so tired of the stigma against breastfeeding!! Loved all the cartoons as well, brought some light to the subject and words that are deeply emotional.

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  128. Loved this! I laughed and even got a little teary a time or two. It is all so right on! I hope you never regret writing it!

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  129. this is totally awesome!! my baby is turning to 1 this coming September and i'm still breastfeeding her.i'm planning to continue and wish not to formula-fed her as along as i could.

    i'm a muslim working mother and last Ramadan (fasting month) was my 1st time breastfeeding + fasting. it was really a challenge for me to keep pumping + producing milk while not eating/drinking from 5.30 am till 7.30 pm. but i managed to set my own pumping schedule and my average milk production was maintained.

    this post is really inspiring!!!

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  130. Blessed to have been able to nurse all 6 of my babies. I miss the closeness & staring into each others eyes.

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  131. I breastfed my daughter for 20 months, she's now intelligent and a very smart 6 y/o. I'm planning to do the same thing with my 7 months old son.

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  132. My late mother told me she cried and cried when she was unable to breast feed me.

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  133. Love this! !! Thanks for sharing

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  134. Perfectly perfect! This just made my day. Thank you from a breast feeding mother of 4. You captured the true essence of breast feeding well perfectly lol

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  135. this was awesome! I had trouble with low milk supply and only got to nurse for 2 weeks before I was forced to switch to formula. it was a very tough time for me because as a new mom I really wanted the bonding time with my baby. but as we switched to formula, his father got to be involved too and it was wonderful to watch him bond with our son... but to all the mothers who can and are breast feeding exclusively, you are wonderful, beautiful women and I salute you also!!!

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  136. This made me laugh sooo much!! Absolutely great post!!
    You can add nursing inside a military plane (can't remember which one) to the list of places to nurse. We were at an air show and she was hungry so when we walked inside this huge plane, they had a ledge on both sides inside the plane where people could sit and I sat there to nurse her. I used a cover and got quite a few looks as people walked by. LOL

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  137. I have no problem with breastfeeding mothers, even in public. But what I hate are breastfeeding mothers thought what they did was the best and that made them the best mother as compared to those that did not breastfed their children, and they go on and on about it.

    Please be mindful and sensitive that some mothers couldn't breastfeed their children even if they wanted to because of various reasons and this 'houlier-than'thou' attitude is hurting them.

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  138. I also breastfed my girl/boy twins for a year. I ended up with an infection after their vaginal/C-section births, and was readmitted to the hospital. Once your babies are released they don't take them back, so off to grandma's. My poor mother & husband brought them back in the next day for me to feed, needless to say I was an emotional wreck and couldn't do it. So the hospital brought in the "industrial double pump" and I would pump out these little 2 oz bottles every couple of hours or so. And grandpa would make the milk runs throughout the day. They were supplemented with formula during this time. After spending a week in the hospital I also went to stay with my mom for another week or so, and we had a system going that wasn't too bad, I thought. One of the babies would wake up to be fed, so I would take care of the first one, wake up my mother so she could burp and change that baby, while I fed the second baby, then we would trade. I tried to keep track of who ate where so I could trade them for the second time through the chow line. My husband & I tried to keep this system going when we got home, with each feeding taking one and a half hours to 2 hours. Then one day while alone at home, with 2 crying hungry babies, I simply took off my shirt and hooked them both up! My sister showed up and walked in on this lovely site saying "you look like a mama pig!" I probably cried. But it's what worked for me. This made feedings take less time, although I did wake up my husband in the night to help with diaper changes. But this is not the end of my story...I gave up on trying to remember who ate where so they each had a side...very bad idea. My son was a little piggy and my daughter ate like a bird. So when I was finally done nursing, I was excited to finally have a normal bra again...but to my dismay I found that my breasts were 2 very different sizes...I sat in the fitting room and cried. What had happened to my 32B figure?? I had one that was a C and one that was a D, they don't sell bras like that! And of course my sweet husband said he couldn't notice it and that he didn't think anyone else would either, but I DID!!! I felt so self conscience for so many years, but through the years of yoyo weight gain and loss due to infertility issues they've balanced out, finally. My babies are now 22 years old. Where did the time go? I do agree about being as modest as possible when nursing out in public, if people have a problem with it, that's just what it is "THEIR PROBLEM" do what works for you, It is a natural part of life, and like any other natural part of life there are those that will find fault, point a finger, and be rude. Don't stoop to their level, maybe they're just jealous because they were bottle fed babies and feel cheated ;) Enjoy this time feeding your baby whether with a bottle or your breast, it's a blessing either way.

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  139. Sitting her with tears (and laughter :)) reading this while pumping, of all things! Thank you so much for capturing all of the highs and lows of being a breast feeding mama!

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  140. My preemie daughter had to stay in NICU for three weeks and my OB wanted me to take the shot to dry me up. I refused and had a successful nursing experience for a year!

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  141. Thanks for your time to write this! It was hilarious, and I enjoyed the read!!!
    gainors.blogspot.com

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  142. Breastfeeding is fine, if you can get your breast to work. I suffered from complete aglactia, lactated for a month at the fifth month of gestation, then dried up completely. No milk to be had. I tried to force lactation to start again, brewers yeast, a gallon and a half of water per day, all of the teas. Nothing worked. I even went into my food animal vet knowledge and shot up a half cc of Lutalyse to force lactation. Nothing worked. I was sobbing as i tried to select the most balanced ration for my son. I wished as i stood in formula alley, that i could consult my feeds and feeding book like i have for my animals just so i could feel like i did the right thing

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    1. What an amazing mama you are to work so hard at something you wanted for your baby! Never feel like a failure! We all do the best we can with what we are given!!

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  143. It was an experience like no other...physical, emotional, spiritual, beautiful...so glad I stuck with it, even though it was difficult getting started with my first child. Thanks for the beautiful "tribute." I wish I had read this years ago when I really needed the support. So glad the new moms have your wisdom and encouragement! Thanks.

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  144. Wonderful! I nursed our first baby in Africa, where we were doing mission work for 2 years, where EVERYBODY nursed her babies. Then I came back to the States and offended almost everyone by my "immodest" approach to breastfeeding our next two babies. The African cultures have it right!

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  145. Thank You!!!! My Husband sent it to me along with apologize 'cause he was not understanding enough through the Breastfeeding season. :-) My Baby is 9 months old he stopped nursing at 5 month and i am still healing from it physically as well as emotionally. But praise the Lord anyways!

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  146. This is amazing! Fabulous post.

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  147. Its been extremely hard and lonely experience for me to have our little princess...living abroad and not having family or friends to talk to in a day to day basis or to give a helping hand while my husband spends loooooong days of work away from us. Reading this brought laugher and tears to my eyes. Thank you. This really gave me a positive boost!

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  148. I love this! Breastfeeding is something that has been VERY important to me! I had to laugh at the spilled milk comment, because I would pump (which I hated) to get a little bit of breastmilk built up in the freezer for when I had to be gone. And one day my hubby was in a hurry and rather than heating up the bottle properly, he boiled it in the pan with water...and it got too hot and he burned himself and spilled it all. He was all like "But I burned myself on the breastmilk" and I was all like "I don't care if you burned yourself. You wasted my breastmilk!" We still laugh about that today, almost 6 years later...lol

    It was so hard, but very rewarding. I was absolutely determined to make it work and we did, even though we struggled with all the complications as well. I still think it was easier, and for us it was less expensive since we didn't bother with all the fancy gadgets.

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  149. Amazing! I connected with every word.

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  150. I breastfed all 7 of my babies, it was simply the normal thing to do. They nursed everywhere imaginable, I didnt ever know if anyone was bothered by it because I never looked around to see who was staring at me (not my problem, theirs). I allowed my children to self-ween. The earliest was 2 1/2, a couple went beyond kindergarden, yes, really. My sisters and I babysat for each other and yes, we nursed each others babies if they needed it. I nursed straight thru three pregnancy's, my breasts were at one time full for 9 years straight. I ate whatever I wanted and to this day, (I'm over 50) I am still within 3 lbs of my high school weight. I breastfed thru working a full time job with my first baby, masteitis, fevers, flu's etc. All of my kids are intelligent with no health issues, and have a very close bond with me. I am a grandmother now X3 with 2 more on the way. Since my 7 kids were so spread out, I was actually able to breastfeed a couple of my grandchildren while babysitting them if they needed. Go back 150 years and my story would be common, to the day when wet-nurses were appreciated and even paid. My great-grandfather was nursed by his black nanny when his mother was out. Breastfeeding is the natural and normal way to nourish, Im hoping that the day will come when it can return to the normalcy level that it once was.

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  151. thank you for writing this, every sentiment was truly deja vu! breast fed my first baby till he was in kindergarten and am nursing my 14-month-old. it was tough to breastfeed during pregnancy but i'm glad i tandem-nursed my kids. it truly is the most fantastic experience and i hope every mom gets to experience even a glimpse of it. God bless you!

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  152. Did it ever occur to you that maybe it was your own determination that helped you make it past the first two months and not the grace of God? So what about the many mothers who try but fail with breastfeeding?? Do they not have enough God or Jesus on their side?? I just don't understand why God would help you through it but not other mother's who are probably praying for help but don't make it.

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    1. I'd say it was probably both my determination AND the grace of God. :) But sometimes it just doesn't work out, as it didn't for me when I tried with my twins. I still give Him all the glory for the successes in my life. Thanks for your comment!

      Karen

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  153. This was awesome. I felt so validated. I both laughed and cried while reading this - everything was so true! With my firstborn, I was set on breastfeeding. It was going to happen NO MATTER WHAT. And oh man, I didn't expect the excruciating pain. I was sore, cracked, bleeding, and giving my son pink tinted milk from all the blood. And I had horrible postpartum depression to boot. It was AWFUL. After seeing lactation consultant after consultant, God finally sent a nurse my way who gave me the words of wisdom that turned my mindset around, she said "Honey, it usually takes at least 6-8 weeks to feel like you and your baby are even starting to get the hang of things." So I told myself I would give it 8 weeks. Right at the 8 week mark, the pain just went away. COMPLETELY. It went from 100 degrees of pain to 0 overnight. If it hadn't been for that lady, I would have quit. It was so horrible. After that, nursing became enjoyable, and I had 10 months of positive experience, but I had to get through that 2 months of desperation and utter despondency to get there.

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  154. Thank you so much for this! I have had the experience of both bottle feeding and breastfeeding, and this post definitely made me laugh until I cried. I have nursed a baby through gall bladder surgery (mine), and open heart surgery (hers).....at that point in my baby's life, nursing her was the only thing that was in my control, and the single biggest thing that I could do for her health. I'm currently nursing baby #5 (7 months old), and looking forward to many, many more months of this special time with my little one.

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